If you work in an environment where enforcement of organizational values and protocols is limited and subpar or if your position does not require you to report to very many people, the risk that you may become involved in illegal criminal conduct may be higher. Keeping yourself out of the throes of corporate crime in California may be doable when you understand and are aware of the triggers that could increase your likelihood of engaging in white-collar crime. 

While a great deal of preventing crime in the workplace falls into the realms of your employer’s responsibilities, your commitment to abiding by organizational rules and regulations can help you to be successful without compromising your integrity, your livelihood and your career potential. Being forthright about reporting any concerns you may have and seeing that you always follow procedural requirements can help you to establish your innocence if a situation ever occurs where you are wrongfully convicted of participating in white-collar crime. 

According to Forbes, your employer should be open and concise about their views on what is and is not ethical. Unethical behaviors should be clearly designated, as well as what consequences you will face if you are found to be exhibiting any of those behaviors. If your employer neglects to establish and implement consequences for people found to be in violation of ethical requirements, it may send a false notion that misbehavior is acceptable. Additionally, when your employer designs incentives for you and your coworkers, they should be realistic and enable you to have a fair chance at receiving rewarding compensation without the temptation of doing something illegal to gain a competitive edge. 

The information in this article is intended for educational purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice.